No Fracking Way

How Big Is Your Frack Yard ?

by Chip Northrup on July 3, 2013

That is the question with fracking gas. If your consider your home – your “back yard” – to be Planet Earth, then the answer to the question “Where is fracking gas safe ?” is . . . some other planet. Like Venus, whose atmosphere is made up almost entirely of carbon dioxide. And the average summertime temperature is 872 degrees fahrenheit. Go frack Venus. Leave the Earth alone.

If you live in the Frack Zone, then the answer may be based on whether you have leased your land for enough money to move to Vermont – out of the Frack Zone. Since once the fracking starts, you will probably want to leave. Nobody wants to live in a gas field, much less move there, unless to frack it. As a Fracker. Not a Frackee.

Governor Cuomo (whose backyard is evidently still New York State) ponders the question on whether to let Fracksylvania continue to ruin itself in order to supply New York with dirt cheap natural gas for the next 50 years or so  . . . and let Fracksylvania keep the radioactive waste, the hookers, spills, frack truck convoys, Man Camps, dead fish, ruined roads and flaming faucets. Real tough decision.

http://statepolitics.lohudblogs.com/2013/07/02/cuomo-natural-gas-can-be-very-effective-but-fracking-questions-persist/

Cuomo: Natural gas can be “very effective,” but fracking questions persist

Gov. Andrew Cuomo had supportive things to say Tuesday about natural gas as a fuel, but said there are still questions about whether it can be developed safely with hydraulic fracturing. Asked Tuesday about President Barack Obama calling natural gas an “effective transition fuel” in a speech on climate change last month, Cuomo said he generally agrees. “The question is not: Do you think natural gas is good?” Cuomo said. “The questions is: Can you, in fracking in that area, develop the natural gas? And what are the health or environmental consequences of that development? That’s a different issue of whether or not you think natural gas is good.” Environmental, health and anti-fracking groups have raised numerous concerns about the fracking process, particularly as it’s related to water quality and the public health. The natural-gas industry says the risks can be properly mitigated

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{ 1 comment… read it below or add one }

Michael Berndtson July 3, 2013 at 3:58 pm

From the post:
“Environmental, health and anti-fracking groups have raised numerous concerns about the fracking process, particularly as it’s related to water quality and the public health. The natural-gas industry says the risks can be properly mitigated.”

Risk mitigation could involve deeded restrictions to private and public groundwater supply wells. Risk is usually determined between the source (aquifer impact zone) and the receptors (local water users). So instead of protecting or cleaning up the source – the easiest and usually cheapest thing to do is cut off the receptors. This solution is sometimes referred to in the environmental business as “risk away.”

A freakout of mine, based on nothing but a gut feeling is that areas once deeded as agricultural and residential will be modified to industrial designation after fracking and production stops. Therefore, the protection and cleanup criteria becomes less stringent and producers are off the hook for cleanup (i.e. modified risk) – regardless of water potability.

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